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Running for Mothers

Hello everyone!! I have been waiting for this moment for months and months.  I am extremely excited to announce that I will be part of the pilot Running Ambassador program for Every Mother Counts (EMC)!

Screen Shot 2014-07-02 at 9.02.12 AMFor those of you who know me, you’ll know this is a perfect marriage of two of my loves: running and public health. So what does this mean for us?

  • Me: Identify a local running event, a 5k or 10k, or even a half marathon, and ensure I can create a team of runners
  • You: Register for the race, join the team, tell your friends about it, thereby raising awareness, and hopefully, raise funds
  • Me: Lead group runs, provide training plans if needed
  • You: Be awesome and support Every Mother Counts!
  • Us: Create a running revolution and make a united impact as a team!

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My Interview with the SkinLess Project

The SkinLess Project presents:
Inspirational Woman May 2014: Ayesha Akhtar
An Interview.

I was honored to be the “Inspirational Woman” for the month of May at the SkinLess Project. To hear more about my endeavors, check out the website here.

You are passionate about advocacy for women and young girls, where does this stem from?

In college (Loyola University Chicago) I received a scholarship into a 4 year women’s leadership program. I knew I was some version of a feminist (or a proponent of the advancement of women), but had no idea about the passion the program would ignite in me by the time I graduated. Thereafter, I viewed everything from the lens as an advocate for women and girls. (Check out the Gannon Center for Women and Leadership)

Ayesha and the Zooma Race

Originally appeared: http://www.everymothercounts.org/blog/201308/ayesha-and-chicago-zooma-race

“Of course ‘every mother counts’,” was the first comment my mom had when I told her the purpose for my early morning need to leave my boys with her as I headed out to the lakefront for the Zooma Chicago race. Unfortunately, as obvious as it may be that all mothers are important, there is still so much work that needs to be done in the arena of maternal health. Narrowing the public health gaps (access, cost & quality) for women seeking prenatal and antenatal care as well as safe delivery care are issues very dear to me. I took a course in graduate school on maternal health and was shocked to learn how poorly the United States ranks in preventing maternal mortality, and even more appalling when compared to other industrial, strong nations.
I spent some of my post-graduate years working with young girls and helping them develop self-esteem, strong minds and bodies, yet yearned for the maternal audience. It all starts at home, I kept thinking, with mothers. I found Every Mother Counts (EMC) and immediately fell in love with the mission and even more so when I read Christy’s story of how EMC was founded. I too had a story! I had two complicated births, despite all my attempts at hiring a doula, a midwife, taking natural childbirth classes, and wanting to refuse medication. Yet I found myself in front of an obstetrician both times. I thought, how could this be happening? I thought I knew everything! How lucky I am to be in a country, state and city that allowed me the freedom to seamlessly be transferred between midwife and MD. I never took it for granted, and was even more grateful when I had to visit my firstborn in the neonatal unit where he spent his first four days of life. I know I am lucky because for every case like mine there are ten women who didn’t survive childbirth.

Volunteering at the Every Mother Counts info booth at the Chicago Zooma race

This is why I left my kids at home and asked EMC if I could volunteer at their table at the Zooma race on a Saturday morning. I want everyone to know that it is entirely possible to die from pregnancy complications or during childbirth, in 2013, nonetheless. I’ve espoused EMC’s mission, and I’m thrilled to help!

In this country we have a choice on everything. Information is thrown at us from every direction, when we want it and when we don’t. We choose to make changes in our lives based on these little nuances. During both of my pregnancies I was enrolled at the University of Illinois School of Public Health and strongly believe that the education I received at that time was life-changing, not only for me and my family, but everyone in my ‘circle’. I believe it is my responsibility as a mother and as a public health educator to empower women with medically-accurate information. Educating and enabling women to use their experiences can also help reduce maternal mortality across the world.